Art Takes Central Role in New Development Reply

By Christopher Harris

At Central Park Shopping Centre in Broadway, Sydney, British artist Luke Jerram’s Play Me, I’m Yours is a global artwork that places pianos in public spaces.

At Central Park Shopping Centre in Broadway, Sydney, British artist Luke Jerram’s Play Me, I’m Yours is a global artwork that places pianos in public spaces.

It’s an unexpected noise in the cacophony of a shopping centre in the Sydney Broadway shopping strip. The rich sounds of Debussy cascade from a piano in the middle of a large empty room. It’s part of British artist Luke Jerram’s Play Me, I’m Yours, a global artwork which places pianos in public spaces.

It is just one piece of interactive art in Level 3 Gallery, located within the Central Park Shopping Centre opposite the UTS Tower.

James Winter, director of Brand X, who manages the space, believes the piano and other pieces of interactive art encourage people to engage with their urban environment.

He says the piano resonates with visitors because it often conjures up family occasions, especially so for international students who are away from home.

The not-for-profit gallery within the Central Park complex is not only an exhibition space for artists, but also provides studio space for a minimal fee.

Mr Winter says although Frasers, which developed Central Park, and the not-for- profit gallery have a relationship, the gallery is a pop-up creative space.

“We negotiate a new term every five months, and I am confidant that we will be extended.”

Avery Harvey is a young photographer who is exhibiting her work in the space this month. She believes the tenure should be extended.

“The space is a benefit to the city because it is offering us both an affordable exhibition space and a studio space in one.

“On my first visit I was shocked to see how the public could watch artists creating their art because the creative process is traditionally a very private thing,” she says.

Georgina Bromley, of Redfern, liked the gallery because it reminds her of galleries she had visited in Asia.

“Urban living typically means less space, so Sydneysiders will have to get used to the idea of visiting a gallery in an office tower.

“I like this gallery precisely because it temporary. I think it makes the art fresher and I can see the engagement with the community.”

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